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Does Ai speak english?

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Ha-Ha-Haru!
Posted: Jan 05, 2007 7:01 pm Reply with quote
金魚花火 金魚花火
Joined: 01 Jan 2007 Posts: 172
Japan was brought its written language by Chinese immigrants. Japanese used Chinese for written things for a while and then came up with 漢文 which was Chinese with special markings to help Japanese read it along with grammar. A set of Chinese characters were then chosen as 万葉仮名 and they were used for their sounds and not for their meanings. 万葉仮名 written in cursive later became 平仮名. I think it was invented by women because I remember in the old days women weren't allowed to be educated or use 漢字. 片仮名 came from students of religion who wanted to simplify the 万葉仮名. The 榊 that Tatsuka was talking about is one of the 国字 (漢字 invented in Japan). 国訓 is 漢字 with a different meaning than in Chinese. 音読み is the Chinese reading of 漢字 and 訓読み is the Japanese reading. I DON'T KNOW WHERE I'M GOING WITH THIS. But yeah, just giving you guys some info. No one really "stole" anything. o-o
 
H_e_a_r_t
Posted: Jan 05, 2007 8:38 pm Reply with quote
さくらんぼ さくらんぼ
Joined: 19 Nov 2006 Posts: 43
Confused I dont think Ai speaks English
 
tsumetai.ame
Posted: Jan 05, 2007 9:32 pm Reply with quote
Planetarium Planetarium
Joined: 07 Apr 2006 Posts: 706
That's interesting about the cursive part.
I never thought of it like that.
Everyone would've "stolen" something if it was "stealing", then!
Someone would've had to either steal the grammar for chinese or english in the process, since both are similar, then!
 
+Fumi
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 8:48 am Reply with quote
上塩タン焼680円 上塩タン焼680円
Joined: 12 Nov 2006 Posts: 339 Location: southern California
Haru is telling true story! kana was sometimes called "women's language" during historical days in Japan, unusual for women to learn Chinese characters! This is condescend? (is this correct word?) attitude toward women that is unfortunately still exist in Japan in many ways, especially for women who like and work in technical professions like me! but going away little bit each day because we hate this attitude so much!
 
tejung
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 4:33 pm Reply with quote
大好きだよ。 大好きだよ。
Joined: 26 Dec 2005 Posts: 259 Location: California,USA
she says HAPPY BIRTHDAY!! ^^
 
davedim
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 5:26 pm Reply with quote
フレンジャー フレンジャー
Joined: 24 Oct 2006 Posts: 935
Sounds more like HEPPY BARSDE to me.

Laughing
 
tsumetai.ame
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 7:04 pm Reply with quote
Planetarium Planetarium
Joined: 07 Apr 2006 Posts: 706
Lol, the Happy Birthday song...
Her English is much better after LOVE JAM album, though!
Like in "Happy Days" the Happy is pronounced more... not english than in "Happy Birthday". But is it just me or does Ai's Happy Birthday sound like... a little bit nasaly... not really a lot but her voice sounds a bit different from her Japanese.
 
Tatsuka Ito
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 7:51 pm Reply with quote
フレンジャー フレンジャー
Joined: 28 Nov 2006 Posts: 918 Location: Surrey,Canada
tsumetai.ame wrote:
My mom told me that in really ancient ancient Korea they used to write Chinese, too, before they developed uhm... the name for the writing I forgot...

Actually some of Japanese is like Chinese, except it's been put to fit Japanese, sorry if it's hard to explain. I remember I just saw some, but now I forget... Jeez, I just saw them yesterday, too. But it's like how there's kun readings? I think that's the name, but that's when the word is read specifically as in Japanese, as in it's not based on the Chinese pronounciations, if that's more clear.



But the reason you got that response is probably just because sometimes people have so much pride in their race, they forget that everyone is equal and every race is as good as the next.


Not in ancient korea, actually not long ago hanja (hanzi) were in use along wtih hangul. Today, hanja is taught as an alternate writing in korea in high school. South korea does have plans to bring it in to wide ruse again though.

Also, chinese writing came to the japanese through the koreans.Actually, most chinese things in japan came via korea.

Ha-Ha-Haru! wrote:
Japan was brought its written language by Chinese immigrants. Japanese used Chinese for written things for a while and then came up with 漢文 which was Chinese with special markings to help Japanese read it along with grammar. A set of Chinese characters were then chosen as 万葉仮名 and they were used for their sounds and not for their meanings. 万葉仮名 written in cursive later became 平仮名. I think it was invented by women because I remember in the old days women weren't allowed to be educated or use 漢字. 片仮名 came from students of religion who wanted to simplify the 万葉仮名. The 榊 that Tatsuka was talking about is one of the 国字 (漢字 invented in Japan). 国訓 is 漢字 with a different meaning than in Chinese. 音読み is the Chinese reading of 漢字 and 訓読み is the Japanese reading. I DON'T KNOW WHERE I'M GOING WITH THIS. But yeah, just giving you guys some info. No one really "stole" anything. o-o


i ll elaborate: About 60~70 kanji today were invented in japan.
700 kanji have only 音読み 1200 Have both 60 or 70 only have 訓読み

義訓 or 熟字訓 are readings of kanji that dont have anything to do with on'yomi or kun'yomi: They are just japanese words, and the kanji given to them are just for meaning,their reading doesnt have any kun yomi or on yomi. here is the joyo list of all words that are like that:
明日 あす、あした
小豆 あずき
海女 あま
硫黄 いおう
意気地 いくじ
一言居士 いちげんこじ
田舎 いなか
息吹 いぶき
海原 うなばら
乳母 うば
浮気 うわき
浮つく うわつく
笑顔 えがお
お母さん おかあさん
叔父 おじ
伯父 おじ
お父さん おとうさん
大人 おとな
乙女 おとめ
叔母 おば
伯母 おば
お巡りさん おまわりさん
お神酒 おみき
母家 おもや
神楽 かぐら
河岸 かし
風邪 かぜ
仮名 かな
蚊帳 かや
為替 かわせ
河原 かわら
川原 かわら
昨日 きのう
今日 きょう
果物 くだもの
玄人 くろうと
今朝 けさ
景色 けしき
心地 ここち
今年 ことし
早乙女 さおとめ
雑魚 ざこ
桟敷 さじき
差し支える さしつかえる
五月晴れ さつきばれ
早苗 さなえ
五月雨 さみだれ
時雨 しぐれ
竹刀 しない
芝生 しばふ
清水 しみず
三味線 しゃみせん
砂利 じゃり
数珠 じゅず
上手 じょうず
白髪 しらが
素人 しろうと
師走 しわす
数寄屋 すきや
数奇屋 すきや
相撲 すもう
草履 ぞうり
山車 だし
太刀 たち
立ち退く たちのく
七夕 たなばた
足袋 たび
稚児 ちご
一日 ついたち
築山 つきやま
梅雨 つゆ
凸凹 でこぼこ
手伝う てつだう
伝馬船 てんません
投網 とあみ
十重二十重 とえはたえ
読経 どきょう
時計 とけい
友達 ともだち
仲人 なこうど
名残 なごり
雪崩 なだれ
兄さん にいさん
姉さん ねえさん
野良 のら
祝詞 のり
博士 はかせ
二十 はたち
二十歳 はたち
二十日 はつか
波止場 はとば
一人 ひとり
日和 ひより
二人 ふたり
二日 ふつか
吹雪 ふぶき
下手 へた
部屋 へや
迷子 まいご
真っ赤 まっか
真っ青 まっさお
土産 みやげ
息子 むすこ
眼鏡 めがね
猛者 もさ
紅葉 もみじ
木綿 もめん
最寄り もより
八百長 やおちょう
八百屋 やおや
大和 やまと
浴衣 ゆかた
行方 ゆくえ
寄席 よせ
若人 わこうど
向日葵 ひまわり 

Obviously of course, there are some words that are written the same in both languages, but probably have some difference in meaning.And there is alot of words (whether they are a combonation of all on yomi or not) that are uniquely japanese, and do no exist in chinese.

Also, japanese is simplified diferently from simplified chinese. for one, it hasnt simplified itself a smuch, 2 it bases most of its simplifications on 草書 Calligraphy, and 3, alot of kanji are just different. deal with it.(Of course some kanji have also been simplified the same as in chinese)


Last edited by Tatsuka Ito on Jan 06, 2007 8:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
tsumetai.ame
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 8:08 pm Reply with quote
Planetarium Planetarium
Joined: 07 Apr 2006 Posts: 706
Tatsuka Ito wrote:
Not in ancient korea, actually not long ago hanja (hanzi) were in use along wtih hangul. Today, hanja is taught as an alternate writing in korea in high school. South korea does have plans to bring it in to wide ruse again though

Oh that's interesting.
i always assumed it was from a long time ago, since I saw it in this drama about the old time.
 
Tatsuka Ito
Posted: Jan 06, 2007 8:22 pm Reply with quote
フレンジャー フレンジャー
Joined: 28 Nov 2006 Posts: 918 Location: Surrey,Canada
its taught, but living in north korea, its use is not allowed. In south korea, you ll bump into a few every few years.
Also a different, the koreans only use traditional forms of chinese, and they also have some hanja (hanzi) developed only in korea. they are called "gugja" . even more interesting, hanja also has a korean version of on and kun yomi. And, they have even borrowed some japanese "kokuji". these are the basic qualities of hanja
 
mitch179
Posted: Jan 07, 2007 12:15 am Reply with quote
桃ノ花ビラ 桃ノ花ビラ
Joined: 10 Dec 2006 Posts: 17 Location: Queensland, Australia
She speaks some English because in Tokyo Friends The Movie, she speaks English because it's filmed in New York, well, most of it anyway.

She says stuff like, Thank you, hello, good morning, Hotdog please.

There are other things she says but yeah, as she is with her friend Maki and she spends time with Ryuuji while in New York, alot of japanese was still spoken.
 
KerushiiAi
Posted: Jan 07, 2007 8:43 pm Reply with quote
ポケット ポケット
Joined: 09 Oct 2006 Posts: 2497 Location: USA
tsumetai.ame wrote:
-kerushii;;
You make me sound like an idiot! (lol just kidding, since no bad would you be doing since it's true...)

oo, sorry, if that's how it sounded! (if you're an idiot, then what're those people at your school?! Laughing )

yeah, and ai's enlish has improved a lot. if you listen to a song with english in it from each of her albums, you can see how much better it is. in the "happy birthday" song, her english is pretty good. and, yes ame, she does sound a bit nasaly, but that's probably 'cause she's trying to copy the accent, if you know what i mean. like, when i say soemthing in japanese, my voice sounds different. like, higher pitched and yeah, a little nasaly. probably not as nasaly as when i speak french though...ShiftyLaughing
and in anime, i don't like watching it dubbed into english a lot because a lot of the time the english voice actors/tresses are trying to imitate how the original character sounds, but while speaking english. that's why they often sound really annoying and fake. Tongue so i like it with subs better. plus, it's good to listen to their voices in japanese, it helps you to learn. Nod
 
davedim
Posted: Jan 07, 2007 10:39 pm Reply with quote
フレンジャー フレンジャー
Joined: 24 Oct 2006 Posts: 935
Tatsuka Ito wrote:
Not in ancient korea, actually not long ago hanja (hanzi) were in use along wtih hangul. Today, hanja is taught as an alternate writing in korea in high school. South korea does have plans to bring it in to wide ruse again though.

Actually, ancient Corea used solely Chinese characters before the invention of hangul.

Hanja was the sole means of writing Corean until King Sejong the Great invented hangul in the 15th century...

And even then hangul still wasn't used much.

It wasn't until the 20th century that hangul replaced hanja..

It's not even an alternative writing system as such...

Hanja is used along with hangul in formal writing.
 
hime-chan
Posted: Mar 07, 2007 10:12 pm Reply with quote
桃ノ花ビラ 桃ノ花ビラ
Joined: 07 Mar 2007 Posts: 14 Location: Singapore
I doubt Ai speak english.. but i think.. she understands english.. because during the off-shots in Tokyo Friends, she talked to a cop about his job and his gun.. ><" Ai-chin is so random.. But she understands him.. Though she doesn't know how to reply him.. Hahah... She knows those simple words for sure..

*peace*
 
tsumetai.ame
Posted: Mar 07, 2007 10:43 pm Reply with quote
Planetarium Planetarium
Joined: 07 Apr 2006 Posts: 706
mitch179 wrote:
She says stuff like, Thank you, hello, good morning, Hotdog please.

Lol, Hotdog please.
It's like that's the only thing Ai knows how to say so she replies to ever question with it.

"What's your name?"
"Hotdog please"
"Why are you here?"
"Hotdog please".

Kind of like the Amanda show, lol! "I'm Amanda's number one fan, please!" (as quoted from Penelope Taynt lol)
 
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